Ok,mom,firstly,you need to understand that this isn't porn,all right?


Ok, mom, firstly, you need to understand that this isn't porn, all right? It's called "hentai". Yes, that's a Japanese phrase, I'm learning Japanese from these videos. Before I get to the part about learning Japanese, though, let me first comment on the cultural implications of hentai.After the second world war, which Japan lost after the nuclear bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the entire country underwent a period of self-reflection and soul-searching. They wanted to understand how events led to the rest of the world responding with such devastating atomic attacks. This led to a strong antipathy towards war-mongering and international aggression.You may have heard about how the Japanese constitution doesn't allow the country to have an active military. Same idea. A lot of post-war Japanese culture is a reflection of such attitudes. For example, the Godzilla movies are not just about giant monsters fighting each other. They're about the horrors of unbridled atomic technology (Godzilla's always depicted as being powered by or healed by nuclear power), and how such a terrifying force can never be allowed to be unleashed on humanity again. On a similar note, Japanese animation enjoyed a resurgence of popularity after the war, due to the populace choosing to turn towards the comforting images of their youth.Japanese kids, much like kids in our country, like to watch cartoons. As a result, psychologically speaking, cartoons represent a reminder of a simpler and more innocent age. This upsurge in popularity resulted in animated images pervading almost all of Japanese culture: from movies, to television, to advertising, to music videos, and so on and so forth.And because animated images were so widely accepted throughout Japan, they were used for almost every type of source material, or to tell any type of story. Animation was no longer the sole domain of children. via /r/copypasta http://bit.ly/2Lx7aJD

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